Name: Elizabeth Anderson

 Title: Assistant Professor

 Affiliation:  Department of Earth & Environment, Florida International University

 Email: epanders@fiu.edu

Website: http://faculty.fiu.edu/~epanders/Home.html

Bio: Elizabeth Anderson is a freshwater conservation ecologist at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, FL. Her research explores the ecology of tropical freshwaters of Central America, the Andean Amazon, and East Africa, and human dependence on these ecosystems. Her work has a strong conservation focus and often involves collaborations with resource managers.

Name: Mauricio E. Arias

Title: Assistant Professor

Affiliation: University of South Florida / Harvard University

Email: mearias@usf.ed

Website: https://www.hks.harvard.edu/centers/mrcbg/programs/sustsci/people/research-fellows/current-fellows/mauricio-arias; https://www.watershedsustainability.org/

Bio: Mauricio graduated with a Bachelors and Masters in Environmental Engineering from the University of Florida, and a PhD in Civil/Natural Resources Engineering from the University of Canterbury (New Zealand). Mauricio’s main expertise and interest relates to watershed-scale interactions among climate, infrastructure development, and water ecosystems in tropical watersheds.

Name: Lucas S. Bair

Title: Economist

Affiliation: U.S. Geological Survey, Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

Email contact: lbair@usgs.gov

Bio: Lucas is an environmental and natural resource economist with expertise in adaptive management and water resources and energy economics and policy. His research includes applied benefit-cost analysis, resource valuation, and integrated assessment modeling with a focus on energy systems and large river basins such as the Colorado and Sacramento-San Joaquin.

Name: Karletta Chief 

Title: Assistant Professor & Extension Specialist 

Affiliation: Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Sciences, The University of Arizona 

Email: kchief@email.arizona.edu 

Website: www.nativeadaptation.arizona.edu

Bio: Dr. Karletta Chief (Diné from Black Mesa, AZ) is an Assistant Professor at University of Arizona focusing on hydrology and climate change impacts on indigenous communities. She received a B.S./M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Stanford University, Ph.D. in Hydrology & Water Resources at UA, and post-doctorate at DRI.

Name: Kurt E. Dongoske, RPA

Title:  Principal Investigator and Tribal Historic Preservation Officer

Affiliation: Zuni Cultural Resource Enterprise, Pueblo of Zuni

Email: kdongoske@cableone.net

Bio: Kurt Dongoske is the principal investigator for Zuni Cultural Resource Enterprise and the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Pueblo of Zuni. He has 39 years of experience as an archaeologist working throughout the western United States with a primary focus on Arizona and New Mexico. Mr. Dongoske served as chair for the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program’s Technical Work Group between 2000–2003 and 2006–2009.

Name: Philip M. Fearnside

Title:  Research professor

Affiliation:  National Institute for Research in Amazonia (INPA)

Email: pmfearn@inpa.gov.br

Website(s): http://philip.inpa.gov.br

Bio: Philip M. Fearnside is a Research Professor at the National Institute for Research in Amazonia (INPA) in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil since 1978. PhD in Biological Sciences (University of Michigan). Publications at http://philip.inpa.gov.br. Identified as the world’s second most-cited scientist on global warming and 7th in the area of sustainable development.

Name: Christine Kirchhoff

 Title: Assistant Professor

 Affiliation: University of Connecticut

 Email: Christine.kirchhoff@uconn.edu

 Website(s):  http://kirchhofflg.weebly.com/

Bio: Dr. Kirchhoff is an Assistant Professor at the University of Connecticut and collaborator with the Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation. She is an interdisciplinary scholar focused on the social dimensions of climate change adaptation, water resources and infrastructure management, and innovation adoption. Specifically, her research seeks to advance our fundamental understanding of: (1) water governance and water security under uncertainty and change; (2) resilient and sustainable water and wastewater infrastructure management; (3) boundary organizations, collaborative science and coproduction; and (4) innovation and the adoption and use of science to inform decision making.

Name: Edgardo Latrubesse

 Title: Full Professor

 Affiliation: Department of Geography and the Environment, University of Texas at Austin

 Email: latrubesse@austin.utexas.edu 

 Website(s): http://sites.utexas.edu/latrubesse/

Bio: Edgardo Latrubesse is a PhD in Geological Sciences, Full Professor at the Department of Geography and the Environment, University of Texas at Austin, an affiliated faculty of the UT-Teresa Lozano Latin American Institute (LLILAS), the UT-Environmental Science Institute (ESI), affiliated professor at the Department of Geology of the Sao Paulo State University-UNESP and Visiting Professor at NTU-ASE, Asian School of the Environment and Earth Observatory of Singapore- EOS. His research interest includes geo-scientific contributions to multidisciplinary research on the Quaternary paleogeography of the tropics, hydro-geomorphology of large rivers, human impacts and global change.

 

Name: Juliana Laufer

Title: Postdoctoral Research Associate

Affiliation: Graduate Program in Environmental Sciences (PGCiamb), Federal University of Tocantins (UFT), CAPES Science Without Borders Project: “Participatory Management of Biocultural Diversity on Indigenous Lands Affected by Hydroelectric Dams in the Amazon”

Email: lauferjuliana@gmail.com

Bio: Dr. Laufer is a biologist with research interests in wildlife ecology and conservation, specifically on response of medium and large vertebrates by human disturbances, and management and conservation of tropical forests, and protected areas, and the environmental impacts of dams on biodiversity. She is currently a post-doctoral researcher at at Universidade Federal do Tocantins, working on data management for the CAPES Science Without Borders focusing on indigenous lands affected by hydroelectric dams across the Amazon.

Name: Mason Mathews

Title: Research Associate and Courtesy Faculty

Affiliation: Tropical Conservation and Development Program, University of Florida.

Email: mason.mathews@gmail.com

Bio: Mason Mathews is a graduate of UF’s Interdisciplinary Ecology doctoral program (Geography emphasis) and is affiliated with the Center for Latin American Studies as a courtesy faculty member. He is leading two components of the Amazon Dams Network (ADN) program using social network analysis techniques.  The first is an annual survey designed to measure the amount of interaction among ADN members, and identify the social factors and ADN activities best suited to develop transdisciplinary research ties. The second is a co-authorship analysis of scientific publications that will identify current research themes related to hydroelectric development in Brazil, and categorize the authors’ areas of expertise, organizational affiliations, academic partnerships, and research sites. Mason is interested in identifying appropriate methodologies to foster transdisciplinary collaboration among social and biophysical scientists studying hydroelectric development.

Name: Paula Franco Moreira

Title: Postdoctoral Research Associate

Affiliation: Graduate Program in Environmental Sciences (PGCiamb), Federal University of Tocantins (UFT), CAPES Science Without Borders Project: “Participatory Management of Biocultural Diversity on Indigenous Lands Affected by Hydroelectric Dams in the Amazon”

Email: paulafrancomoreira@gmail.com

Bio: Dr. Moreira is a post-doctoral Researcher of the Environmental Sciences Program at the Federal University of Tocantins in the Brazilian Amazon, Researcher of the Amazon Dams Network. PhD concluded at Institute of International Relations, University of Brasília, Brazil. Her research areas include global environmental politics focusing on the regulation and governance of water use for hydro energy purposes, participatory management of biodiversity in Indigenous Territories, Indigenous Knowledge, climate change, the Amazon region and transnational civil society networks. Currently, she is working on two projects: The regulation, policies and the governance of the use of water resources for hydro energy purposes on five indigenous territories in the Brazilian Amazon basin, and the impact of the dams on the participatory Indigenous Peoples’ management of biodiversity; and the other concerns Indigenous Peoples’ knowledge(s) and the global environmental governance. Brazilian registered lawyer since 2011.

Name: Artur de Souza Moret 

Title: Associate Professor 

Affiliation: Universidade Federal de Rondônia – UNIR 

Email: amoret@unir.br

Bio: Physicist, Master in Science Teaching, PhD in Energy Systems Planning, Leader of the Sustainable Renewable Energy Research Group, Professor at the Federal University of Rondônia, Faculty in the Graduate Program in Regional Development and Environment. In the past 10 years, Dr. Moret has worked extensively on the socio-economic impacts of hydroelectric power plants in the Madeira watershed.

Name: Evandro Mateus, Moretto, PhD

Title: Associate Professor 

Affiliation: Institute of Energy and Environment – IEE and School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities – EACH, University of São Paulo – USP 

Email: evandromm@usp.br 

Website: http://lattes.cnpq.br/7081792205107960

Bio: Dr. Moretto is an Associate Professor at the School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities – EACH and Institute of Energy and Environment – IEE of the University of São Paulo – USP, leader of the Research Group for Environmental Planning and Management – PLANGEA/USP and President of the Brazilian Association for Impact Assessment – ABAI. His research interests focus on  environmental impact assessments and socio-economic impacts of large-scale development projects.

Name: Dernival Venâncio Ramos

Title: Associate Professor, History

Affiliation: Federal University of Tocantins (UFT)

Emaildernivaljunior@gmail.com

Bio: Dernival Venâncio Ramos is a Historian and an Associate Professor in the Departament of History and in the Program of Culture and Territory studies at the Tocantins Federal University, Araguaina Campus.  Dr. Dernival’s research interests are on displacement and resettlement related to development projects, traditional communities, and traditional knowledge.  He also works in oral history, cultural history, Coloniality and Decolonial practice and theory.

Name: Ligia Raquel Rodrigues Soares

Title: Postdoctoral Research Associate

Affiliation: Graduate Program in Environmental Sciences (PGCiamb), Federal University of Tocantins (UFT), CAPES Science Without Borders Project: “Participatory Management of Biocultural Diversity on Indigenous Lands Affected by Hydroelectric Dams in the Amazon”

Emailligiarrsoares@gmail.com

Bio: Dr. Soares is currently a post-doctoral Researcher of the Environmental Sciences Program at the Federal University of Tocantins (UFT) in the Brazilian Amazon, linked to the CAPES Science without Borders project. She is also an associate researcher at the Núcleo de Estudos e Ação Indigenista (NEAI/UFT).  Ligia earned her Bachelor degree in Social Sciences from the Federal University of Maranhão (UFMA). She completed her Master’s degree in Environmental Sciences at Federal University of Tocantins (UFT), and a PhD in Social Anthropology from the Federal University of Amazonas (UFAM). She conducted a excghange program at the Smithsonian Institution (US). She has expertise and research interests in social and cultural Anthropology, Indigenous Ethnology and Ethnomusicology.

Name: Robert Walker

Title: Professor

Affiliation: Department of Geography and Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida

Home page: http://geog.ufl.edu/dr-robert-t-walker/

Email: roberttwalker@ufl.edu

Bio: Dr. Robert Walker is an Economic Geographer with a PhD in Region Science. He studies the human drivers of land change, and develops quantitative models that explain such phenomena as tropical deforestation and forest transition. His regional focus is Amazonia, where he has studied the cattle industry, logging, colonization, and land conflict. Recently, he has initiated a research agenda focusing on the role played by large-scale infrastructure projects in economic development and environmental change.